National Geographic — Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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Photo by @salvarezphoto | Standing watch day and night theses Basketmaker engravings have looked over the San Juan River in Southern Utah for centuries. They are larger than life and this panel wraps around a commanding cliff face. There are hundreds if not thousands of engravings. The Basketmakers (1500 BCE-750 CE) flourished in the Southwest for over a thousand years. The culture spans the introduction of corn from Mesoamerica and the adoption of the bow and arrow. The most striking remnant of those people are rock art panels scattered through the 4 corners region. I was in the Southwest last week scouting locations for a National Geographic Society / @ancientartarchive project looking at art in Western National Monuments. I had set up a night time time lapse of this panel with the stars rising in the background but just after this frame clouds closed in and shut it down. #bearsears #basketmaker follow @salvarezphoto for more. ...more
6 days ago
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Photo by Corey Arnold @arni_coraldo . The first sockeye salmon of the season are beginning to arrive in Alaska’s Bristol Bay and huge numbers of fish, over 50,000,000 are expected to return to spawn or be harvested by people, brown bears, eagles, and a host of other animals and plants who thrive on the life giving protein that this fish brings to the environment. While their are many bad news stories in the world in regards to the state of fish in the sea, this is not one of them. Bristol Bay is home to more the half of the world’s spawning Sockeye Salmon and one of the biggest success stories in sustainable commercial fishing due to science based management of the fishery that works. It is also one of the few truly wild, hatchery free salmon fisheries. The biggest threat to the bay is a potential large scale copper mine, the so called Pebble Mine, which is applying for permits to build a massive open pit copper mine in the headwaters of Bristol Bay. . In addition to being a @natgeo photographer, I also run a salmon setnet fishing operation here in Bristol Bay during June and July each year. I will be posting insta stories and images during the season (when internet connection allows) as i fish here and on my personal profile @arni_coraldo . Pictured here is Shy and Ryan, my neighbors, hauling a net full of Sockeye into a set net skiff during last year’s season. . #salmon #commercialfishing #bristolbay #setnet #fishwork #sockeye #fishing #net #alaska #seafood #food #pebblemine ...more
6 days ago
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Photograph by @simoncroberts. A group of scouts near Trongsa in central Bhutan. It was Bhutan’s Jigme Singye Wangchuck, or Dragon King, who formulated the country’s signature quality of life indicator, Gross National Happiness (GNH). Since 1971, the country has rejected GDP as the only way to measure progress. In its place, it has championed GNH, an ethos of environmental sustainability, cultural preservation and holistic civic contentment. Wangchuck envisioned a Bhutan driven by Buddhist values, but also saw the crucial need for the remote, landlocked country to diversify and modernize to provide welfare, support high quality sustainability, and insure against the risk of natural disasters on agrarian livelihoods. Every five years under the direction of the Centre for Bhutan Studies and GNH Research, survey-takers conduct questionnaires across the country. The most recent survey, in 2015, found that 8 percent of the people were "deeply happy," 35 percent identified as "extensively happy," and 47.9 percent registered as "narrowly happy”. With WiFi-ready coffee shops emerging in Thimphu, youngsters in particular are flocking in droves away from rural labor toward the brighter lights of the capital. So as Bhutan’s GDP grows, raising “happiness” is likely to become that every bit harder. Follow @simoncroberts to see more photographs from this series and other works. #simonroberts #bhutan #gnh #grossnationalhappiness #bhutanscouts #bhutanscoutsassociation ...more
6 days ago
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Photo by @amivitale. Kamara, a Kenyan rhino keeper is nuzzled by black rhino Kilifi who he hand-raised along with two other baby rhinos at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy ( @lewa_wildlife) in Kenya. Kamara spends 12 hours every day watching over the vulnerable baby rhinos. If you went back 50 years, this is where one of the densest populations of black rhinos lived, but today most people living here have never seen a rhino in their life despite it being the most perfect habitat for them. In two generations, this animal was poached almost to extinction. These communities and people like Kamara hold the key to saving Africa's great animals. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com. ...more
6 days ago
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Photo by @erikalarsen888/ Santiago Yahuarcani is a member of the Huitoto Aymeni clan originally coming from La Chorrera a town on the border of Peru and Colombia. His family was removed from their land during the era of exploitation of rubber in the Amazon. Santiago comes from the Jaguar Clan and his last name translates to ‘blood of the jaguar’. The jaguar for the Huitoto people is a powerful and sacred animal. Their shamans can take the form of the jaguars for hunting and other purposes. Santiago and his wife Nereda are now living in Pevas, Peru. They are a family of artists and storytellers who dedicate their life to the preservation of their people’s identity and the knowledge of their ancestors and spiritual world. They create jaguar masks to honor and perpetuate the forms of transformation from human to jaguar. The masks that hold this power are called Janaba. This work is part of a larger project on the communication between humans and the natural world. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com. ...more
6 days ago
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Photo by @dzalcman Crosses mark the grave sites at a cemetery in Quinhagak, a Yup'ik village of about 800 residents on the southwest coast of Alaska. This image is from an ongoing project on the impact of assimilation policies on Indigenous communities. For all of 2018, I'll be interviewing survivors from Maine to Hawaii about their experiences in government boarding schools, mission schools, and foster care. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com. ...more
1 week ago
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Video by @anandavarma / An Anna's hummingbird flies in a wind tunnel blowing at 26 miles per hour. These birds may be small, but they are much more powerful than you would think! This video was made possible by a storytelling grant from the National Geographic Society and became part of my hummingbird story for National Geographic Magazine. The focus of the story was on what tools scientists use to study these amazing birds. This video starts at 2000 frames per second and ends at 3000 frames per second. That means by the end, it is playing 100 times slower than what your naked eye would see. I modified an industrial humidifier to create a make-shift fog machine so that the air movement in the wind tunnel would be visible. Scientists use fog machines to visualize the air flow around hummingbird wings and wind tunnels to measure their flight performance. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com. ...more
1 week ago
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Photo by @edkashi / Santos Felipa Abad de Arismendis, 57, lost her son, Frank Jairzinhio Arismendis Abad, 33, last year from CKDu, or chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology. Arismednis lives in Talara, Peru, and her son worked part-time at the docks from 11 to 16 years old when he began to suffer from a kidney-related illness. At 24 years old, he was diagnosed with CKDu and was placed on dialysis. To receive his treatment, he had to travel to Piura, three hours from his home. After heavy rains one day, the road became impassable and he missed his dialysis and died. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com. ...more
1 week ago
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Photo by @hannahreyesmorales / Young boys attempt to fly plastic kites in an abandoned boat in Tondo, Philippines—one of the most densely populated places on Earth. The neighborhood of Baseco, where the boys live, rests where the Pasig River and the Manila Bay meet, and much of the community's plastic waste winds up in the waters. The Philippines is at the center of the world's marine biodiversity, but ranks third, after China and Indonesia, in ocean pollution. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria—an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com. ...more
1 week ago
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Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). Details of the bride’s dress at a Nepali wedding in Kathmandu. The wedding date is decided following the advice of an astrologer. By looking at the stellar constellation of the couple's birth time and dates, an auspicious day is chosen. Red and green are the main colors, they speak of vitality, tradition and… love. For more interesting cultural encounters, please visit @paleyphoto @natgeocreative #wedding #weddingtradition #weddingdress ...more
1 week ago
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Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - Acrobat contortion - 3-year-old twins at the Changfa Acrobatic School in Wuqiao County, Hebei, China. Students start at a young age to help improve flexibility and master their art form. This ancient performing art has thrived here for over two thousand years, and may prove to be their ticket to success. If they make it here, a few of these children may even be accepted into the China National Acrobatic troupe that travels the globe entertaining audiences abroad. #Acrobat #Acrobatics #twins #Hebei ...more
1 week ago
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photo by: @renaeffendiphoto // Female elephant Mae Perm developed a bond with Jokia, the blind elephant and her female companion. Mae Perm lead Jokia by the trunk during their walks on the grounds of the Chiang Mai Elephant Nature Park. For more stories please follow: @renaeffendiphoto #elephants #love #friendship #animals #nature #thailand ...more
1 week ago
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